Fruit Trees

We have a selection of hardy Fruit Trees suitable for the Bend Climate. Fruit trees are a great tree choice if you’re looking to entice pollinators, harvest delicious crops, and feast your eye upon a bounty of blooms.  

Fruit trees thrive best when provided:

  • Full sun locations
  • Well-draining and nutritious soils
  • Regular watering schedule in the spring, summer, and fall until leaves have dropped (especially in the hot summer months of the year).
  • Pruning in the spring or fall (for health and crop management)
  • Pollinator-friendly companion plants
  • Fencing 

 

Not all fruit trees will produce fruit on their own. Some require another fruit tree to cross-pollinate with (some even require two!). Fruit trees that don’t require cross-pollination are called “self-fertile”. However, self-fertile trees may produce a healthier and more bountiful crop due to cross-pollination. Worthy cross-pollinating varieties should bloom at a similar time in the season (i.e. “early”/”mid”/”late”) and carry different parent genetics. 

Our fruit trees are dwarf varieties and will reach approximately 15 feet tall and 10 feet wide at maturity. When planted in the sun with access to water these trees can grow a foot plus per season especially after a strong root system is established (2-3 years). Fruit trees will begin to bear fruit on average after 4-7 seasons. 

Below is a hardiness key by location:

Location

USDA Hardiness Zone

Bend

3 to 6

Sunriver

3 to 4

Terrebonne

4 to 6

La Pine

3 to 4

Madras

4 to 5

Prineville

3 to 6

Redmond

3 to 6

Sisters

3 to 5

Apple Varieties

  • Chehalis
  • Yellow Transparent
  • Green Gravenstein
  • Red Delicious
  • Cameo
  • Arkansas Black
  • Granny Smith
  • Gala
  • Jonathan
  • Cox Orange Pippin
  • Jonagold
  • Golden Delicious
  • Galarina
  • Ambrosia
  • Pink Lady
  • Winecrisp
  • Braeburn
  • Melrose
  • Kingston Black
  • Fuji & Red Fuji
  • Northern Spy
  • Honey Crisp

Hardiness: 3-8

Self Fertile: Partial

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Early blooming varieties (Yellow Transparent, Red Delicious,  Arkansas Black)

Bloom: Early

Description: Excellent choice for growers who are after a very large, sweet, yellow-green apple that they can eat right off the tree. Fruit is similar to the beloved Golden Delicious (which we may also carry) but it is larger and crispier, and with a hardy skin. The crop is reliable, highly productive, and known for resistance to scab and partial resistance to mildew. This classic was developed north of Chehalis, WA, in 1937.

Hardiness: 5-8

Self-Fertile: No – Needs two other apple varieties to cross-pollinate with! This is a Triploid (3 sets of genes) fruit. Not a viable cross-pollinator.

Best Cross Pollinator: Needs two early blooming varieties (Yellow Transparent, Red Delicious, Arkansas Black)

Bloom: Early

Description: The national apple of Denmark. This variety is triploid and has sterile pollen so it simply is not a viable cross-pollinator. It requires not just one other tree to cross-pollinate with but two other early bloomers. This apple has some variability to it. This variety is greener than typical and has a firm, coarse texture and lower sugar content which does make it an excellent choice for sauces and cooking.

Hardiness: 4-8

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Golden Delicious, Cameo, Gala, Jonagold, Fuji or Pink Lady – Other Early-Mid blooming varieties (Yellow Transparent, Arkansas Black, Granny Smith, Jonathan, Ambrosia, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Early – Mid

Description: Oregon’s own from Hood River in 1956. The most widely planted apple tree in North America! The crop is heavy and consistent. Fine texture and classic floral sweet flavor.

Hardiness: 4-8

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Early-Mid varieties (Yellow Transparent, Red Delicious, Granny Smith, Gala, Jonathan, Golden Delicious, Galarina, Ambrosia, Pink Lady, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Early-Mid

Description: Arkansas Black Apples are commonly used for eating raw after they’ve had a few months to ripen and sweeten in cold storage. The Arkansas Black Apple is a dessert apple and is frequently used in recipes for cobblers, pies, and table dishes.

Hardiness: 5-8

Self Fertile: Yes

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Mid blooming varieties (Arkansas Black, Red Delicious, Gala, Jonathan, Golden Delicious, Galarina, Ambrosia, Pink Lady, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Mid

Description: Firm, tart, crispy fruit that is sometimes pucker sour off the tree. Excellent for pies, sauces, salads, dipped in honey, or paired with cheese and crackers. Bright green skin that gives it the classic granny smith look. This variety was developed in Australia in 1868 by Maria Ann Smith.

Hardiness: 5-8

Self Fertile: Yes

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Cox Orange Pippin, Golden Delicious, or Red Delicious – Other Mid Blooming varieties (Arkansas Black, Granny Smith, Jonathan, Galarina, Ambrosia, Pink Lady, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Mid

Description: Widely grown, parents are three of the world’s most important varieties: Cox Orange, Delicious, and Kidd’s Orange. Orange over yellow when young and more red as matures. The crop is heavy, consistent, and typically begins at a young age.

Hardiness: 4-8

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Gala or Florina – Other Mid blooming varieties (Arkansas Black, Granny Smith, Jonathan, Ambrosia, Pink Lady, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Mid

Description: Gala was developed in France. Fruit small to medium has a high sugar and low acid ranking with a crisp texture. Known to be a very grower-friendly variety due to its tolerance and resistance to a list of diseases and pests. Is an impressive variety when it comes to storing over the colder months, especially in comparison to the Gala.

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: Partial

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Winecrisp or Jonagold – Other Mid blooming varieties (Granny Smith, Gala, Galarina, Ambrosia, Pink Lady, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Mid 

Description: Developed in New York in the 1700’s this apple has excellent disease resistance and produces a prized dessert apple. Fruits are medium-sized, brightly colored red skin, fine texture, juicy, sweetly bursting with a subtly acidity. The crop is heavy.

Hardiness: 4-8

Self-Fertile: No – Needs two other apple varieties to cross-pollinate with! This is a Triploid (3 sets of genes) fruit. Not a viable cross-pollinator.

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Jonathan or Golden Delicious – Needs two mid-blooming varieties (Arkansas Black, Granny Smith, Galarina, Ambrosia, Pink Lady, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Mid

Description: Jonagold is a large apple, and makes a substantial snack. The coloring is yellow of Golden Delicious, with large flushes of red. This is a crisp apple to bite into, with gleaming white flesh. The flavor is sweet but with a lot of balancing acidity – a very pleasant apple. This variety has sterile pollen so it simply is not a viable cross-pollinator.

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: Yes

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Red Delicious, Pink Lady, Jonagold, Gala, Cameo, or Grimes Golden – Other Mid blooming varieties (Arkansas Black, Granny Smith, Jonathan, Galarina, Ambrosia, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Mid

Description: Originally discovered on the Mullins family farm in West Virginia. This apple has stellar multipurpose value – fabulous fresh and cooked. Dependable heavy crop thanks to long-lasting blooms. And of course, the skin is golden.

Hardiness: 4-8

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Mid blooming varieties (Arkansas Black, Red Delicious, Granny Smith, Gala, Jonathan, Golden Delicious, Galarina, Pink Lady, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Mid

Description: Found in the 1990s in Cawston, British Columbia Canada, and is now a national favorite. Fruits are medium-sized with glossy skin that is creamy yellow with bright blush stripes. Low acidity lends to a sweet mild flavor like honey. Moderate to heavy crop.

Hardiness: 5-8

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Golden Delicious or Lady Williams – Other Mid blooming varieties (Arkansas Black, Red Delicious, Granny Smith, Jonathan, Galarina, Ambrosia, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Mid

Description: This late-ripening apple was developed in Australia in 1989 and is a cross between Lady Williams and Golden Delicious. Skin is red-pink and fruit is sweet and subtly tart, firm, and crispy.

Hardiness: 4-8

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Cox’s Orange Pippin or Jonathan – Other Mid blooming varieties (Arkansas Black, Red Delicious, Granny Smith, Gala, Golden Delicious, Galarina, Pink Lady)

Bloom: Mid

Description: Developed a disease-resistant breeding program at Purdue, Rutgers, and Illinois Universities. Proven strong immunity to scab and resistance to fire blight and powdery mildew. The fruit is strikingly deep purple-red almost black from a distance with a matte finish. The texture is firm and the flavor is tangy and has a subtle spice to it. Flavor peaks at about a month in cold storage and stores for 6.

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Mid-Late blooming varieties (prairie fire crab apple, Granny Smith, Gala, Jonathan, Golden Delicious, Galarina, Pink Lady, Winecrisp, Brarburn, Kingston Black, Fuji, Cosmic Crisp, Honey Crisp)

Bloom: Mid-Late

Description: The prized Ohio state apple. Known to reliably store well over the colder months when you’re hankering for a sweet-tart apple (around x-mas). The flavor is not only sweet-tart but becomes richer with age. Is said to be outstanding for cooking and baking.

Hardiness: 5-9

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Mid-Late blooming varieties (Granny Smith, Gala, Jonathan, Golden Delicious, Galarina, Pink Lady, Winecrisp, Brarburn, Melrose, Fuji,  Cosmic Crisp, Honey Crisp)

Bloom: Mid-Late

Description: If you are a fermentation fiend then this is the apple for you! This is a cider apple. Known to offer a full-bodied hard cider – soft tannins, rich flavor, and remarkably balanced, citrus-apple-butterscotch flavor. When fresh the fruit is sharp and carries an astringent aftertaste. Originating from England in 1820 at one point in history was the most valuable cider apple varieties. Fruits are small, dark red, and can be disease-prone. Very high cold storage rating.

Hardiness: 4-8

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Red Delicious – Other Mid-Late blooming varieties (Granny Smith, Gala, Jonathan, Galarina, Pink Lady, Winecrisp, Brarburn, Melrose, Kingston Black, Cosmic Crisp, Honey Crisp)

Bloom: Mid-Late

Description: This apple is very common in grocery stores for its large, rich, crunchy, and balanced quality! Maybe one of the most popular in the world. Hybrid was created in Japan in the 1930’s.

Hardiness: 3-9

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Cosmic Crisp – Other Late or Mid-Late blooming varieties (Granny Smith, Gala, Jonathan, Galarina, Pink Lady, Winecrisp, Brarburn, Melrose, Kingston Black, Fuji)

Bloom: Late

Description: Developed in Minnesota in 1974. Very popular for valid reasons. One of the best fresh off-the-tree fruits with its explosive burst of crispy honey-sweet flavor. Another excellent cold-hardy choice.

Hardiness: 5-8

Self Fertile: Yes

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Early blooming varieties (Yellow Transparent, Red Delicious, Cameo, Arkansas Black)

Bloom: Mid  

Description: Excellent choice for growers who are after a very large, sweet, yellow-green apple that they can eat right off the tree. Fruit is similar to the beloved Golden Delicious (which we may also carry) but it is larger and crispier, and with a hardy skin. The crop is reliable, highly productive, and known for resistance to scabs and partial resistance to mildew. This classic was developed north of Chehalis, WA, in 1937.

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Cox Orange Pippin variants – Mid bloomers (Arkansas Black, Red Delicious, Granny Smith, Jonathan, Golden Delicious, Galarina, Ambrosia, Pink Lady, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Mid

Description: This apple is a classic English 19th-century apple and is parent to many more variants. With a unique blend of complex flavors with descriptions like pear, melon, freshly squeezed OJ, and mango, this apple is known to have dimensional flavor! Not known to be disease-resistant but known to be worth the green thumb challenge.

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: Yes

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Mid-Late blooming varieties (Granny Smith, Gala, Jonathan, Cox Orange Pippin, Golden Delicious, Galarina, Pink Lady, Winecrisp, Melrose, Kingston Black, Fuji, Northern Spy, Cosmic Crisp, Honey Crisp)

Bloom: Mid-Late

Description: Unique variety developed in New Zealand. Tangy, rich, medium-large, juicy, and crispy fruit that has red skin with splashes of golden yellow. Great for a sweet dessert!

Hardiness: 3-8

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Red or Golden Delicious – Other Early-Mid blooming varieties (Chehalis, Yellow Transparent, Arkansas Black, Granny Smith, Jonathan, Ambrosia, Winecrisp)

Bloom: Early-Mid

Description: This apple was discovered in 1987 as a “chance” apple meaning it came to be from the chaos and luck of open pollination – the old-fashioned way. The Cameo apple is a medium-sized, evenly-shaped fruit. It is most recognizable because of its distinctive red stripes that mix with shades of yellow and pale green in a variety of ways. Mild flavor, a hint of pear that reduces beautifully when cooked.

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Mid-Late blooming varieties (Granny Smith, Gala, Jonathan, Cox Orange Pippin, Galarina, Pink Lady, Winecrisp, Brarburn, Melrose, Kingston Black, Northern Spy, Cosmic Crisp, Honey Crisp)

Bloom: Mid-Late

Description: When these apples are exposed to sunlight, they develop red blushes and streaks. Skin is thin and fruit is firm, tender, and has a mild balanced flavor of sweet to acidic making it a solid dessert apple candidate. Has solid potential for cider pressing as well.

Pear Varieties

  • Bartlett (red or green)
  • Nijisseiki Asian Pear
  • D’Anjou
  • Moonglow
  • Flemish Beauty
  • Shinseiki Asian Pear

Hardiness: 5-9

Self Fertile: Partial

Bloom Time: Early-Mid

Best Cross Pollinator: European Early-Mid blooming varieties (D’Anjou, Moonglow)

Description: This pear has many names. Originating in Europe in the 1700s’s named the Williams Christ pear whereas here in the States it is better known as Bartlett at the end of the day this pear is more than just a name it is sweet yet slightly tart, large, smooth, and can be delicious eaten fresh or layered on a crusty bread with cheese. Red is red and Green is green-gold with a slight red blush. Midseason harvest.

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: Partial

Bloom Time: Early-Mid

Best Cross Pollinator: Asian Pear Early-Mid blooming varieties (Shinseiki)

Description: Most popular Asian Pear! The medium to large-sized, round fruit has a smooth yellow skin with white speckles (lenticels). The flesh is white with a clean, refreshing, crisp, juicy, sweet flavor. Ripens late but is worth the wait. Fresh eating is delightful, and chilled is even better!

Hardiness: 5-8

Self Fertile: No

Bloom Time: Early-Mid

Best Cross Pollinator: European Early-Mid blooming varieties (Bartlett, Moonglow)

Description: D’Anjou has the best-keeping quality of all pears – up to 7 months! Green skin and is firm, mildly acidic-sweet, fine-textured, large, and makes a quality cider candidate. Heavy crop!

Hardiness: 5-8

Self Fertile: No

Bloom Time: Early-Mid

Best Cross Pollinator: European Early-Mid blooming varieties (Bartlett, D’Anjou)

Description: Fruits are medium-large, mild and subtly acidic, soft texture, juicy, bright red skin, and ripening in September. Resistant to fire blight!

Hardiness: 3-8

Self Fertile: Partial

Bloom Time: Mid-Late

Best Cross Pollinator: European Mid-Late blooming varieties (Bosc)

Description: This cold hardy European variety bears fruit that are sweet, juicy, medium-large, yellow-green-red, and ripen in September. Fresh eating. Heavy crop! Is susceptible to pear scab – a fungal disease that is more common west of the Cascades.

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: Partial

Bloom Time: Mid-Late

Best Cross Pollinator: Asian Mid-Late blooming varieties (Nijisseiki)

Description: Thin yellow skin with sweet white flesh, refreshing, crunchy, round, medium-sized fruit ripens August. Consistent heavy crop! Eat fresh and chilled, you will not regret it.

Hardiness: 5-9

Self Fertile: No

Bloom Time: Late

Best Cross Pollinator: European Late blooming varieties or Mid-Late blooming varieties (Flemish Beauty)

Description: Fruits are medium-large, spicy-sweet, with cinnamon brown skin and a buttery smooth texture. Excellent multipurpose fruit ripening in Late September.

Cherry Varieties

  • Sweetheart
  • Rainier
  • Van
  • Stella
  • Royal Ann/Royal Queen
  • Bing

Hardiness: 5-9

Self Fertile: Yes

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Early or Early-Mid blooming varieties (Sweetheart, Rainier, Van)

Bloom: Early

Description: Late frost tolerant, good disease resistance, and self-pollinating. Pink blossoms and deep purple-red fruit, firm, sweet and meaty. Originally developed in Canada.

Hardiness: 5-9

Self Fertile: Yes

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Early-Mid blooming varieties (Lapins, Rainier, Van, Stella, Royal Ann, Bing)

Bloom: Early-Mid

Description: Fruits are large, bright red, sweet with an acidic-tart undertone and ripen late in the season for two weeks providing a longer harvest period. The crop is heavy! Ornamental value – Beautiful pink blooms in the spring. Developed in British Columbia, Canada. Mid-late summer ripening.

Hardiness: 5-9

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Bing or Van – Other Mid-Early blooming varieties (Lapins, Sweetheart, Stella, Royal Ann)

Bloom: Early-Mid

Description: The one and only Rainier cherry gives you peak sweet cherry flavor, hands down! One of the world’s sweetest cherries. Creamy yellow skin with pink-red blush, big sweet, and sumptuous. Blooms are pink-white. Mid-Season harvest. Developed in our very own Pacific Northwest region at WSU named after the Washington volcano, Mt. Rainier.

Hardiness: 5-8

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Rainier – Other Early-Mid blooming varieties (Lapins, Stella, Royal Ann, Bing)

Bloom: Early-Mid

Description: This cherry has medium-large-sized fruits that are ruby red, and glossy, with a sweet-tart balance. The crop is heavy (up to 50lb+) and harvesting is mid-season. White blossoms.

Hardiness: 5-8

Self Fertile: Yes

Best Cross Pollinator: Other Mid blooming varieties (Sargent flowering cherry, Rainier, Van, Royal Ann, Bing)

Bloom: Mid

Description: Fruits are heart-shaped, red, firm, sweet cherries. The crop is heavy! Developed in 1968 in Summerland, British Columbia Canada. Good multipurpose fruit!

Hardiness: 5-8

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Royal Ann or Rainier – Other Mid blooming varieties (Van, Stella)

Bloom: Mid

Description: Bing’s were developed in Salem, Oregon in 1875. Fruits are deep crimson, glossy, large, firm, sweet, and juicy. A classic fresh snacking delight. Bloom color is white and harvest is typically in July.

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: No

Best Cross Pollinator: Not Bing – Other Mid blooming varieties (Rainier, Van, Stella)

Bloom: Mid

Description: This cherry has a very close resemblance and flavor to the rainier cherry. Fruit are sweet and bright in flavor, golden with pink blush, and are excellent for fresh eating and canning. The crop is heavy (up to 50 lbs. from one tree – even from young trees) in the early summer! Cold hardy. White blossoms in the springtime. Developed in Iowa in 1847.

Plum Varieties

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: Yes

Best Cross Pollinator: European varieties that are Mid-Late blooming (Brooks, Petite, Green Gage)

Bloom: Mid-Late

Description: A worldwide famous plum variety. Known for sweet, medium-sized, and reliable fruit production. The pit is easy to remove.

Hardiness: 4-9

Self Fertile: Partial

Best Cross Pollinator: European varieties that are Mid blooming (Petite Green Gage, Italian)

Bloom: Mid

Description: Fruits are large, sweet, golden inside and deep purple-blue skin. Great multipurpose fruit especially for drying. Ripening in early-mid September. Vigorous when planted with another plum tree variety.

Hardiness: 4-8

Self Fertile: Partial

Best Cross Pollinator: European varieties that are Mid-late blooming (Brooks, Italian)

Bloom: Mid-Late

Description: Fruits have a distinctive rich flavor and carry a high culinary value. Fruits are sweet, firm, green-gold, and ripen in early August. This European plum was developed in the 17th Century.

Hardiness: 4-8

Self Fertile: Yes

Best Cross Pollinator: European varieties that are Late blooming (Petite Green Gage, Italian)

Bloom: Late

Description: Developed in New York in a Cornell University program in 1926. Tender fruit that does not cling to the stone, sweet, firm, golden-green flesh with purple skin. White blossoms.

Peach Varieties – Out of stock

Nectarine Varieties – Out of stock