Our Favorite Evergreens Trees

Below is a hardiness key by location:

Location

USDA Hardiness Zone

Bend

3 to 6

Sunriver

3 to 4

Terrebonne

4 to 6

La Pine

3 to 4

Madras

4 to 5

Prineville

3 to 6

Redmond

3 to 6

Sisters

3 to 5

Growth Rates:
Typically our growing season is from spring to the end of summer. Growth rates vary depending on the species, climate preference, altitude, sun requirements, root growth limitations, and many other variables. Generally, sun-loving and drought-tolerant evergreen trees built for high altitudes grow faster in Bend. However, this is not a firm rule and there are exceptions. A saying goes first they sleep, then they creep, then they leap. In other words, expect the growth rates during the initial two to three seasons to be slow and low. Generally, evergreen trees are deer resistant, trees that have exposed trunks should be protected from (fall-winter time) antler raking within the first 1-3 years of being planted. 
 

Evergreen Trees

Native: Europe and Asia 

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-7

Leaf or Needle: Deep green medium-length needles in bundles of two (bark has a warm hue in contrast to Bosnian pines)

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Canopy Shape: Rounded, pyramidal shape

Height & Width in Bend: 30′ tall and 12-14′ wide. We also carry varieties in stock that are dwarf, compact, or columnar.

Growth Rate: Fast – ~1′ per year for the first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted 2’+ per year.

Planting Notes: Great for screening and or wind breaks, generally deer resistant

Fun Fact: It has recorded resistance to salt spray (used in road de-icing) and various industrial pollutants, and has resistance to snow and ice damage.

Native: Balkans and Southern Italy

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Leaf or Needle: Thick dark green needles in bundles of 2 (bark is has a cooler pale hue to it in comparison to other pines)

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Canopy Shape: nice teardrop pyramid shape

Height & Width in Bend: 20-30′ height and 8-10′ wide. *We may carry varieties in stock that are dwarf and compact.

Growth Rate: Moderate-Fast – 6-8” first 2-3 years, after becoming fully rooted ~1’+ per year.

Planting Notes: Great for screening, very deer resistant due to stiff thick needles.

Fun Fact:  Can adapt to extreme environmental conditions and is also a great colonizer. It is resistant to sulfur dioxide, hydrogen fluoride, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone pollution and is further able to withstand wind, ice, and heavy snow. 

Native: P. longaeva interior mountains of California, Nevada, and Utah at 5-11k’. P. artista mountains of Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona at 7-12k’.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-7

Leaf or Needle: Needles are deep green, in tight bundles of 5, ~1.5-2.5” long, white “speckle” (resin droplets) and waxy (stomatal bloom) lines highlight needles. Bundles are densely arranged lending to a bottle brush look. 

Sun Exposure: Full sun and part shade 

Canopy Shape: Multistem to single stem, rounded, tiered. 

Height & Width in Bend: 15-20’ tall and 10-12’ wide in many many years. 

Growth Rate: Slow – 3-5” per year first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted 8” or less per year. 

Planting Notes: Interest tree, architectural, protect from deer browsing and antler raking in the fall for the first 2-3 fall/winters. 

Fun Fact: Oldest known living trees on the planet! Growing for thousands of years. The oldest known tree is a P. longaeva dated at 5k years in the CA White Mountains. 

Native: latifolia ranges from mountains of south Alaska to Mexico (and east to Rockies and South Dakota). Murrayana ranges from mountains of Washington to Northern Mexico.      

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Leaf or Needle: Needles are 2-3” long, deep-yellow green, 2 per bundle. Woody cones are small and prickly. 

Sun Exposure: Full Sun (not shade tolerant)

Canopy Shape: Slender cone 

Height & Width in Bend: 30-40’ tall and 10-15’ wide

Growth Rate: Fast – Less than 1’ per year first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted 1-2’+ per year.

Planting Notes: Need full sun and well draining soils. Targets of bark beetle, fungus, and mistletoe. Generally deer resistant. 

Fun Fact: Despite bark beetle infestation and fire, old stands hundreds of years old are still growing. Variety ‘Chief Joseph’ turns gold in the winter. 

Native: Japan and Korea

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-7

Leaf or Needle: Flexible 2-4” long needles in bundles of 5 blueish green. Woody round cones that are attached directly to the trunk and branches wrapping all around.

Sun Exposure:  part shade

Canopy Shape: Irregular-Pyramidal that broadens with age.

Height & Width in Bend: 20’ tall and 15’ wide. 

Growth Rate: Moderate – 6-8” per year first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted ~1’ + per year. 

Planting Notes: Trees need some shade and moist soil. Protect trunk from antler raking in the fall first 2-3 falls and winters.

Native: Our most abundant native tree!

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

Leaf or Needle: Long green, usually in bundles of 3 but sometimes 2.

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Canopy Shape: Pyramidal

Height & Width in Bend: Max height over 100+ feet and 15+ feet wide.

Growth Rate: Fast – ~1′ per year for first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted 2’+ a year.

Planting Notes: Needs space to grow well and can be staggered in a zig-zag pattern for thicker screening. Generally deer resistant.

Fun Fact: Bark smells like butterscotch and has an impressive tap root. 

Native: Europe and Asia

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

Leaf or Needle: Blue green, medium length needles, bundles of two 

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Canopy Shape: bushy pyramidal shape

Height & Width in Bend: 30’ tall and 12-15’ wide.

Growth Rate: Fast – 1′ per year first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted ~2′ per year.

Planting Notes: Great for screening and windbreaks, generally deer resistant. 

Fun Fact: The pine was grown in and used extensively by the coal mining regions of Flanders, Belgium. It was used to fortify tunnels, primarily because it would make a cracking sound when in need of replacement. Large patches of forest, mostly containing the species, are still scattered over the countryside.

Native: Altitudes of 3-7.5k’ in the Alps and Carpathian Mountains of central Europe. 

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-7

Leaf or Needle: Soft needles are blue-green. 

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to part shade 

Canopy Shape: Pyramidal and rounded when young – crown broadens with age. 

Height & Width in Bend: 20-25’ tall and 10′ wide. *dwarf variety available. 

Growth Rate: Slow – up to 8” per year first 2-3 years. After becoming roots established 1’ per year. 

Planting Notes: Makes a good screen, protect from deer browsing and antler raking in the fall for the first 2-3 fall/winters. 

Fun Fact: Their pine “nuts” (cone seeds) are edible but difficult to get to. 

Native: Cultivar of P. flexilis (limber pine) of Rocky Mountains from Canada to New Mexico, at 5-12k’ altitudes.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-7

Leaf or Needle: Soft wispy needles are blue-green, silver-white lines (stomatal bloom), 2-4” long, tight bundles of 5. Woody cones are 8” long with thick scales. 

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to part shade

Canopy Shape: Rounded-pyramidal that broadens with age.

Height & Width in Bend: 20-25’ tall and 12-15’ wide. 

Growth Rate: Fast – ~1’ per year first 2-3 years. 1’+ per year after becoming fully rooted

Planting Notes: Creates a nice screen, protect from deer browsing and antler raking in the fall for the first 2-3 fall/winters. 

Fun Fact: Limber pine co-evolved with Clark’s nutcrackers – seed dispersers

Native: Northeastern US and Canada

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

Leaf or Needle: Flexible 2-5” long in bundles of 5 (rarely 3-4) blueish green (some varieties more yellow-green). Long cylindrical soft cones.

Sun Exposure: Full Sun and part shade tolerant (4 hours of full sun or more)

Canopy Shape: Oval to teardrop. 

Height & Width in Bend: 30-40’ tall and 15’ wide. We also carry columnar & weeping varieties. 

Growth Rate: Fast – less than 1’ per year first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted 1-2’+ per year. 

Planting Notes:  Creates fluffy screen. Must be protected from deer browsing and antler raking in the fall for the first 2-3 fall/winters. 

Fun Fact: White pine are recorded as the tallest trees in northeastern America. Used to build ships in colonial years of American history.

Native: Alaska and northwest Canada to Newfoundland, and dipping south into the US from Minnesota to northern New England. Isolated range in the Black Hills of South Dakota.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-8

Leaf or Needle: Pointy single deep green needles on small woody pegs on branches, emerging from all sides of the branch. Whitish lines along each side of needle (wax/stomatal bloom). 

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Canopy Shape: Dense pyramid/conical

Height & Width in Bend: 20-40’ tall and 10-15’ wide.

Growth Rate: Slow-Moderate – 4-6” per year first 2-3 years. After roots established 1’+ per year

Planting Notes: Makes a good windbreak or screening tree. Rigid mature needles are more deer-resistant. 

Fun Fact: Nesting trees for a wide range of birds.

Native: Rocky mountain country – Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

Leaf or Needle: Pointy single blue to blue/green needles on small woody pegs on branches, emerging from all sides of the branch. Wax is prominent on younger leaves to prevent water loss giving them a bluer quality than older leaves. Long cylindrical pink-purple seed cones in the spring and brown in the fall when seeds release.  

Sun Exposure: Full Sun 

Canopy Shape: Classic pyramid

Height & Width in Bend: 50’+ tall and 15’+ wide. *We carry dwarf, weeping and columnar varieties.

Growth Rate: Slow-Moderate – 4-6” per year first 2-3 years. After roots established 1’+ per year.

Planting Notes: Good screening tree and very deer resistant.

Fun Fact: Low branches provide habitat for small birds (Quail) and seeds are fed upon by birds. 

Native: Northern, Central and Eastern Europe 

USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-7

Leaf or Needle: Pointy single green needles on small woody pegs on branches, emerging from all sides of the branch. Seed cones are long, cylindrical (may be 4-8” long) pink-green in the spring and brown in the fall and winter when seeds release.

Sun Exposure: Full sun and tolerates some shade. 

Canopy Shape: Classic pyramidal tree shape.

Height & Width in Bend: 40’ tall and 15’+ wide. *We also carry dwarf, weeping, and columnar.

Growth Rate: Fast – Up to 1’ per year first 2-3 years. After roots established 1-2’ per year.

Planting Notes: Great screening tree. More resistant to deer.

Fun Fact: Wood is used for making the sounding board in violins – has been called violin wood tree.

Native: Drina River Valley of Serbia, Eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina. 

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-7

Leaf or Needle: Pointy single deep green needles on small woody pegs on branches, emerging from all sides of the branch. Silvery-white on the underside of needles. 

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Canopy Shape: Narrow pyramidal 

Height & Width in Bend: 30-35’ tall and 10-15’ wide. 

Growth Rate: Slow – less than 1’ per year 

Planting Notes: More resistant to deer, nice screen or living xmas tree. 

Fun Fact: Attracts songbirds

Native: Japan up to altitude of 2,900m

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-7

Leaf or Needle: A unique deciduous conifer – Needles are bright green emerging in the spring which turn golden yellow in the fall and drop. Needles come in tufted bunches of 10+ per bunch. Small cones come out green then turn brown. Needles regrow each spring.

Sun Exposure: Full sun and tolerates some shade

Canopy Shape: Conical crown and narrow when young (10-30 yr.) that broadens with age.

Height & Width in Bend: 40-50′ and 10-15’ wide. *We carry weeping japanese larch.

Growth Rate: Fast – 1’+ per year within first 2-3 years. After roots established 2’+ per year.  

Planting Notes: Prefers sun and well-draining soil. Protect from browsing and antler raking in the fall for the first 2-3 fall/winters. 

Fun Fact: Japanese larch is an important forestry tree in Japan – used for general construction. Is considered a very successful pioneer tree in the native range.

Native: Southern Cascades, Blue, The Sierra Nevada, Klamath, Siskiyou, and Rocky Mountain regions of the US. High Altitude (3-11.2k feet).

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

Leaf or Needle: Single needles attached along flat plane of branch but twist and reach skyward, rounded tips, grayish-green on top and silver-white on underside, and densely arranged. Papery upright cones are pale green-purplish in summer 3-5” tall and turn brown and fall apart by fall. 

Sun Exposure: Full Sun and part shade tolerant.

Canopy Shape: Dense pyramidal/conical  

Height & Width in Bend: 40’ tall and 15-20’ wide.

Growth Rate: Slow – less than 1′ per year

Planting Notes: Fairly dense attractive and good for screening and interest. Softer may need deer protection the first few falls and winters.

Fun Fact: Crushed needles give a faint smell of tangerine.

Native: Pacific coast from Alaska to Northern California

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-7

Leaf or Needle: Small leaves nested in flattened drooping sprays of branches and branchlets. Deep green-grey color. Terminating in cones. 

Sun Exposure: Part shade to full shade.

Canopy Shape: Weeping branches conical overall form

Height & Width in Bend: 15-25’ tall and 8’ wide. 

Growth Rate: Slow – less than 1’ per year

Planting Notes: Beautiful evergreen interest tree for shade gardens. Protect young trees from deer browsing and antler raking first 2-3 falls and winters.  

Fun Fact: well-known rot resistance, due to aromatic compounds in the wood.  

Native: North African Mountains (Atlas mountains)

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6-9

Leaf or Needle: Grey-blue-silvery short needles in bundles of 15-30 per bunch. Cones look like green eggs sitting on top of branches eventually turning brown.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Canopy Shape: Pyramidal but crown broadens with age. 

Height & Width in Bend: 25-30’ tall and 6-10’ wide. Broadens with age. We also carry a weeping and a columnar variety. 

Growth Rate: Moderate – Less than 1’ per year first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted, 1’ per year.  

Planting Notes: Stunning interest, color, less dense screening tree. Needs deer protection fall/winter, for 1st 2-3 years.

Fun Fact: Heat and drought tolerant when established. 

Native: Western Himalaya

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6-9

Leaf or Needle: Grey-green to blue green short needles in bundles of 15-30 per bunch. Tiered branches giving a more lacy look to the tree. Cones look like green eggs sitting on top of branches eventually turning brown. 

Sun Exposure: Part sun or shade, quite shade tolerant. 

Canopy Shape: Fluffy conical, tiered branches 

Height & Width in Bend: 25-35’ tall in and 10-12’ wide.  We carry weeping variety. 

Growth Rate: Slow-Moderate – 3-6” per year first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted 1’ per year.

Planting Notes: Good tree for interest in the garden. Generally deer resistant.

Fun Fact: Trees in their native range can reach up to 200’ tall, much smaller here. 

Native: Southern Oregon to California 

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-8

Leaf or Needle: Small leaves nested in flattened sprays of branches and branchlets. Giving you a handshake or high five. Cones like a duck beak. Cinnamon strips of bark. 

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Canopy Shape: Rounded pyramid

Height & Width in Bend: 25-35’ tall and 10’ wide. Reaching 70-100’ in native forests. 

Growth Rate: Moderate – 4-8” per year first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted, 1’ per year. 

Planting Notes: Fluffy screening tree, protect from deer browsing and antler raking first 2-3 falls and winters

Fun Fact: Wood is commonly used to make pencils. The aromatic wood is an adaptation to pest resistance and decaying fungi.  

Native: Southwestern region of US Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and central northern Mexico 

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6-9

Leaf or Needle: Small blue-green waxy leaves tightly nested around branches and branchlets. Creating a smooth look. Cones are like soccer balls and remain closed until bearing branch is broken or exposed to fire. 

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Canopy Shape: Conical, rounded

Height & Width in Bend: 20-30’ tall and 10-15’ wide. We also carry a weeping variety. 

Growth Rate: Slow – 4-8” per year. 

Planting Notes: Good screen option, beautiful blue color. Generally deer resistant. 

Fun Fact: High drought tolerance. 

Native: Western slopes of Sierra Nevada (endemic species) (endangered list status – in native range)

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9

Leaf or Needle: Very small leaves arranged in a nested radial fashion along branches and branchlets which terminate in cones develop to be brown and egg shaped. Seeds drop under heat pressure (fire dependent/serotinous). Leaves turn purple in the winter months.   

Sun Exposure: Full sun 

Canopy Shape: Round Pyramidal shape

Height & Width in Bend: 100’+ tall and 20-30’ wide. We also carry a weeping variety

Growth Rate: Fast – 1’  per year first 2-3 years of growth. After becoming fully rooted, 1-2’+ per year.

Planting Notes: Beautiful screen tree for large spaces. Protect young leaves and branches from deer browsing and antler raking first 2-3 falls and winters. 

Fun Fact: Most massive tree on the planet. Trees are fire-dependent for seed disbursement. 

Native: Higher altitudes of Pacific Northwest mountains from Alaska to California & Northern Rockies of Montana and Idaho.  

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-8

Leaf or Needle: Soft single deep blue-green needles attached to branches all around. Less than 1” long. Bluish-gray underside. Small delicate woody pendant cones 1-2” long. 

Sun Exposure: Part shade to filtered light –  shade tolerant. 

Canopy Shape: Narrow, pyramidal, we carry single and multi-stem trees. 

Height & Width in Bend: 20’ tall and 8’ wide. 

Growth Rate: Slow – less than 1’ per year. 

Planting Notes:  A smaller evergreen,  that makes a nice interest tree. Protect young needles and trunk from deer browsing and antler raking for the first few fall and winter seasons.

Fun Fact: Grows up to 130’ in lower and wetter climates, but is dwarf and stunted at higher altitudes. Mt. Hemlock in landscapes remains smaller. 

Native: Central and eastern Canada

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

Leaf or Needle: Flattened arrangement of singly attached deep green needles with silvery undersides. Less than 1” long. Small pendant woody cones 1-2” long. 

Sun Exposure: Part sun – full shade tolerance

Canopy Shape: Pyramidal and a droopy top

Height & Width in Bend: 20-30’ tall and 10-15’ wide.  We also carry a weeping variety. 

Growth Rate: Slow – less than 1’ per year. 

Planting Notes: Good tree for interest, screening, and shadier locations. Protect young trees from deer browsing and antler raking for the first few fall/winter seasons. 

Fun Fact: American pioneers made tea from the tree’s leafy twigs and used its branches as brooms.

Columnar Evergreen Trees

Native: Cultivar of Eastern White Pine

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

Leaf or Needle: Flexible 2-5” long in bundles of 5 (rarely 3-4) blueish green (some varieties more yellow-green). Long cylindrical soft cones.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Canopy Shape: Columnar shape and dense branching

Height & Width in Bend: 20-30’ tall and 4-6’ wide

Growth Rate: Moderate-Fast – less than 1’ per year within first 2-3 years. After roots established 1’+ per year 

Planting Notes: Protect young trees from deer browsing and antler raking first 2-3 falls and winters. Fence line hedge, accent, and adds bright color in the winter months. 

Native: Cultivar of blue spruce.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

Leaf or Needle: Pointy single blue to blue/green needles on small woody pegs on branches, emerging from all sides of the branch. Wax (aka stomatal bloom) is prominent on younger leaves to prevent water loss giving them a bluer quality than older leaves. Long cylindrical pink-purple seed cones in the spring and brown in the fall when seeds release. 

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Canopy Shape: Columnar shape and dense branching

Height & Width in Bend: 15-20’ tall and 5-6’ wide.

Growth Rate: Slow – less than 1’ per year

Planting Notes: Less prone to browsing and antler raking. Hedge or windbreak, small gardening, adds bright blue color in the landscape. Deer resistant.

Native: Cultivar of Norway spruce

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

Leaf or Needle: Pointy single green needles on small woody pegs on branches, emerging from all sides of the branch. Pink-green cones in the spring and brown in the fall.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Canopy Shape: Columnar shape and dense branching

Height & Width in Bend: 20’ tall and 3-4’ wide

Growth Rate: Moderate-Fast – less than 1’ per year within first 2-3 years. After roots established 1’+ per year 

Planting Notes: Generally deer resistant. Hedge or windbreak, small gardening, pot up, and adds bright color in the winter months. 

Dwarf & Weeping Evergreens

Native: Cultivar of the Norway Spruce

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

Leaf or Needle: Pointy single green needles on small woody pegs on branches, emerging from all sides of the branch. Seed cones are long, cylindrical (may be 4-8” long) pink-green in spring and brown in the fall and winter when seeds release.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Canopy Shape: Wide set triangle with weeping meandering branches

Height & Width in Bend: 12-15’ tall and 10’ wide 

Growth Rate: Moderate – 8” per year first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted 1’ per year.  

Planting Notes: Make a dense low screen and bright pink cones in the spring add to seasonal interest. Generally deer resistant.

Fun Fact: Winner of the prestigious Award of Garden Merit of the Royal Horticultural Society. Low branches have the potential to make great habitat for Quail. 

Native: Cultivar of Blue Spruce – Rocky Mountain country – Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Shape: Round mounding shrub (broader top than Montgomery spruce)

Height: 6′ tall and wide (beyond graft which can be low or tall)

Deer Resistant: Yes (but young growth at risk)

Leaf: Pointy single bright blue to blue/green needles on small woody pegs on branches, emerging from all sides of the branch. Silver wax (aka stomatal bloom) is prominent on younger leaves to prevent water loss giving them a bluer quality than older leaves.

Native: Cultivar of Blue Spruce

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

Leaf or Needle: Pointy single blue to blue/green needles on small woody pegs on branches, emerging from all sides of the branch. Wax (aka stomatal bloom) is prominent on younger leaves to prevent water loss giving them a bluer quality than older leaves. Cylindrical pink-purple seed cones in the spring and brown in the fall when seeds release. 

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Canopy Shape: Weeping and asymmetric and stout and dense

Height & Width in Bend:  height is wherever it is bent and starting to grow down- weep, 4-8’wide. 

Growth Rate: Slow – Less than 1’ per year

Planting Notes: Pokey needles are less likely to be browsed upon by deer. Unless the trunk is exposed antler raking is also less likely. This tree looks great as a focal point, in a tall pot.  Splash of color in the winter. Can be left alone to grow freely or pruned and sculpted or draped over a rock. 

Fun Fact: Each weeping blue spruce is unique due to their asymmetric quality! 

Native: Cultivar of Norway Spruce

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

Leaf or Needle: Pointy single green needles on small woody pegs on branches, emerging from all sides of the branch. Pink-green cones in the spring and brown in the fall.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Canopy: Weeping and asymmetric and stout and dense

Height & Width in Bend: 4-8’ tall can be staked/trained to grow taller, and- 4-6’ wide. 

Growth Rate: Slow – Less than 1’ per year

Planting Notes: Pokey needles are less likely to be browsed upon by deer. This tree looks great as a focal point, or in a tall pot. Can grow freely or be pruned and sculpted to grow over a rock or down a slope.

Fun Fact: Each weeping Norway spruce is unique due to its asymmetric quality!

Native: Cultivar of Canadian Hemlock

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Leaf or Needle: Flattened arrangement of singly attached deep green needles with silvery undersides. Less than 1” long. Small pendant woody cones 1-2” long. 

Sun Exposure: Part shade-deep shade

Canopy Shape: Mounding shrub-like with weeping branches – will only become as tall as it is staked 

Height & Width in Bend: 2-5’ tall (or where tree is bent over) and 4-6’ wide. 

Growth Rate: Slow – less than 1’ per year

Planting Notes: Protect from browsing and antler raking first 2-3 falls and winters. Branches are trainable and can be staked to grow taller or draped over rock.

Native: Cultivar of European or Japanese Larch

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-8

Leaf or Needle: A unique deciduous conifer – Needles are bright green emerging in the spring which turn golden yellow in the fall and drop. Needles come in tufted bunches of 10+ per bunch. Small cones come out green then turn brown. Needles regrow each spring.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Canopy Shape: Weeping, asymmetrical.

Height & Width in Bend: 5-7’ tall and 4-5’ wide 

Growth Rate: Slow-Moderate – Less than 1’ per year first 2-3 years. After becoming fully rooted 1’ or less per year.  

Planting Notes: Protect from deer browsing and antler raking. Branches are trainable and can be staked and sculpted, or planted in a larger pot. 

Native: Hybridization of japanese yew and english yew. Therefore not a naturally occurring species. 

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4

Sun Exposure: Part shade to full shade (‘Hicksii’ cultivar can handle more sun)

Shape: Columnar multistem hedge-like (Hicks & H.M. Eddie) or shrub form (Densiformis).

Height & Width in Bend: 8-10’ tall and 2-4’ wide. Slow grower.

Leaf or Needle: small flat pointed green single leaves attached to branches on all sides. Cones look like red berries. 

Planting Notes: Nice hedge or shrub for shade garden. Toxic to dogs. 

Deer Resistance: Yes (chemically)

Fun Fact: European labyrinths are made with yew. Yew carries taxol which is a chemotherapeutic compound.  

Native: Cultivar of Mugo Pine. Originally from high elevations of Europe. 

USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-8

Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

Shape: Round mounded shrub

Height: 3-5′ tall and wide

Deer Resistant: Yes (but young growth at risk)

Leaf: Green needles, 1-3” long, rigid, thick, and in bundles of 2. 

Wintergold variety

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Shape: Same

Height: 1-2′ tall and wide (slightly wider)

Deer Resistant: Yes (but young growth at risk)

Leaf: Same and golden